Document Repository

Title:      Website:   File:
Author:
Keyword:
Topics:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T   U V W X Y Z ALL

Page 1 of 1

Title File Author Description Article Date
THE IMPACT OF STIGMA AND DISCRIMINATION Against LGBT People in West Virginia Christy Mallory, Luis Vasquez ,Taylor N.T. Brown, Rayna E. Momen, Brad Sears In this study, we provide data and research documenting the prevalence of several forms of stigma and discrimination against LGBT adults and youth in the U.S. and in West Virginia specifically, including discrimination and harassment in employment, housing, and public accommodations; bullying and harassment in schools; and family rejection of LGBT youth. We discuss the implications of such stigma and discrimination on LGBT individuals, in terms of health and economic security; on employers, in terms of employee productivity, recruitment, and retention; and on the economy, in terms of health care costs and reduced productivity. To the extent that West Virginia can create a more supportive environment for LGBT people, it will reduce the economic instability and health disparities experienced by LGBT individuals, which, in turn, would benefit the state, employers, and the economy.   February 2021
Teen SENSE: Model Sexual Health Care Standards for Youth in State Custody This resource reflects the minimum requirements that facilities should meet in order to appropriately address the sexual health care needs of youth in the state’s care. Youth should be provided with confidential, culturally competent care including physical and mental health screenings; universal offers of STI and HIV testing; written information, counseling, and treatment related to pregnancy, STI and HIV transmission and prevention, and sexual violence; and ongoing care and discharge planning related to sexual and reproductive health.   2012
The Cuyahoga Youth Count: A Report on LGBTQ+ Youth Experience in Foster Care. Matarese, M., Greeno, E., Weeks, A., Hammond, P. The findings in this study include the overrepresentation of youth with diverse SOGI in foster care in a Midwest county, disparities in their treatment experiences and increased mental health hospitalizations, as well as more youth with diverse SOGI reporting use of substances and experiencing discrimination and adverse experiences. These findings are symptomatic of the need for increased SOGIE-tailored prevention services for families, clinical interventions to support family reunification and family accepting and affirming behaviors, and policy and practice shifts both within the child welfare system as well as partnering with the child/youth-serving provider organizations and systems.   2021
The DSM-5 and the Politics of Diagnosing Transpeople Zowie Davy In the DSM-5, there has been a change in the diagnosis for transpeople of all ages from Gender Identity Disorder (GID) to Gender Dysphoria (GD), in part to better indicate the distress that transpeople may experience when their gender identity feels incongruent. The aims of this article are, firstly, to question whether changing the diagnosis lessens the stigmatization of transpeople. I will suggest that the semantic change from GID to GD marks ‘‘inverted’’ gendered expressions as pathological and, thus, continues to stigmatize transpeople. Secondly, the article explores the development of the GD diagnosis, and illustrates how the scientific data this were founded on are contentious. The article then demonstrates how the trans anti-pathologization movement has challenged the perceived pathologizing effects of the DSM-5 classification of GD. The article examines a selection of Western transgender community advocates’ websites, forums, and blogs. From these sources, the article then explores the different narratives of trans- people and political groups who offer details of their praxis, and evidences how the trans anti-pathologization advocates use the & ZowieDavy zdavy@lincoln.ac.uk available science and human rights discourses to contest the role of psychiatry in the treatment of transpeople.   June 2015
The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding At a time when lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals--often referred to under the umbrella acronym LGBT--are becoming more visible in society and more socially acknowledged, clinicians and researchers are faced with incomplete information about their health status. While LGBT populations often are combined as a single entity for research and advocacy purposes, each is a distinct population group with its own specific health needs. Furthermore, the experiences of LGBT individuals are not uniform and are shaped by factors of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, geographical location, and age, any of which can have an effect on health-related concerns and needs.   2011
The Model Standards Project: Creating Inclusive Systems for LGBT Youth in Out-of-Home Care This article describes the history, development, and goals of the Model Standards Project (MSP), a collaboration between Legal Services for Children and the National Center for Lesbian Rights. The article concludes with recommendations for implementation of the standards in local jurisdictions.   2006
The Supporting the Well-Being of System-Involved LGBTQ Youth Certificate Program Center for Juvenile Justice Reform Georgetown University Program is designed to help juvenile justice, child welfare, and other system partners target and improve outcomes for at-risk LGBTQ youth. The program focuses on the particular challenges faced by LGBTQ youth in child-serving systems (including juvenile justice, child welfare, education, and behavioral health) as well as strengths and protective factors common to the population. It highlights effective policy and practice reforms that promote positive youth development and takes a holistic approach to addressing their needs.  
The Trevor Project Research Brief: LGBTQ Youth with a History of Foster Care LGBTQ youth are at elevated risk for suicide compared with their straight/cisgender peers (Johns et al, 2019; Johns et al., 2020). This risk stems from experiences of minority stress including victimization and rejection rather than something inherent about being LGBTQ (Meyer, 2003). Victimization and rejection from caregivers can also result in LGBTQ youth involvement in the foster care system (Newcomb et al., 2019), which is strongly associated with greater suicide risk among youth in general (Brown, 2020). Despite the overrepresentation of LGBTQ youth among those who have entered foster care (Baams, Russel, & Wilson 2019), there remains a lack of studies examining which subgroups of LGBTQ youth are most at risk of being in foster care as well as how a foster care history relates to suicide risk among LGBTQ youth.   May 2021
The Trevor Project: National Survey on LGBTQ Youth Mental Health 2021 Our third annual survey provides brand new data on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health care disparities, discrimination, food insecurity, conversion therapy, and suicide — in addition to the benefits of LGBTQ-affirming spaces and respecting the pronouns of transgender and nonbinary youth.   2020
The Tribal Equity Tool Kit: Tribal Resolutions and Codes to Support Two-Spirit and LGBT Justice in Indian Country This toolkit provides sample legal language for adapting tribal resolutions and codes to recognize the rights of all tribal citizens, including Two Spirit and LGBTQ Natives. This is the third edition of the toolkit published with the support of a growing coalition of national organizations including the National LGBTQ Task Force, the Western States Center and the Center for American Progress.  
The Whole Youth Model: How Collecting Data About Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Gender Expression (SOGIE) Helps Probation and Youth Courts Build More Authentic Relationships Focused on Improved Well-Being Aisha Canfield, M.P.P. Shannan Wilber, Esq. Angela Irvine, Ph.D. Malachi Larrabee-Garza This guide presents both a guide for collecting SOGIE data as well as a perspective on how this practice should fit within reforms to treat all youth respectfully with the ultimate aim of improving well-being.   December 19, 2019
Tips for Child Welfare Professionals: Talking About LGBT-Headed Families This tip sheet discuss talking to and working with LGBT-headed families.   2012
Toolkit for Practitioners/Researchers Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning Runaway and Homeless Youth Ferguson & Maccio This resource discusses the overrepresentation of LGBTQ youth in homeless and runaway populations.   September, 2012
Toolkit to Support Child Welfare Agencies in Serving LGBTQ Children, Youth, and Families Provides links to knowledge- and skill-building resources; including articles, videos, tools, training curricula, tip sheets, information briefs, websites, and other products, to help state and territorial child welfare agencies meet the needs of LGBTQ children, youth, and families.  
Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Children in California Foster Care The purpose of this brief is to support the efforts of California child welfare professionals to promote the safety, permanency, and well-being of transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) children* in foster care. -Provides an overview of terms and concepts related to gender identity and expression, and accurate information about gender identity development, -Provides accurate information on the impact of bias on the health and safety of TGNC children, and -Describes legal and professional standards governing services to, and treatment of, TGNC children in the child welfare system.   2016
Transitioning Our Shelters: A Guide to Making Homeless Shelters Safe for Transgender People This resource is a guide for making shelters safer for transgender people, including implement an effective nondiscrimination policy.   2003
Twenty Things Supervisors Can Do to Support Workers to Competently Practice with LGBTQ Children, Youth, and Families Tip sheet that focus on ways a supervisors can support staff working with LGBT clients and/or families.  
Two Spirits, One Dance For Native American Artist “Two-spirit” is how some Native Americans describe people whose gender identity doesn’t fit as strictly male or female. Meet Ty DeFoe, who’s using traditional dance to take this gender identity back from the negative connotations established during colonization. Shot by video journalist Courtney Quirin for AJ+  


Page 1 of 1