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Title File Author Description Article Date
Ensuring Competent Residential Interventions for Youth with Diverse Gender and Sexual Identities and Expressions Douglas A. Glick This paper focuses on the many issues faced in the field in providing quality residential interventions for youth of sexual diversity, including sexual orientation and gender identity. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and two-spirit (LGBTQI2-S) youth in residential care, open expression of sexuality or gender identity can be a significant challenge, with many barriers faced both within the program and in the community at large. This paper provides guidelines and strategies for serving and supporting LGBTQI2-S youth, building on the efforts of programs that have successfully created “sexual and gender minority-positive” cultures.   2014
Expanding Resources for Children III: Research-Based Best Practices in Adoption by Gays and Lesbians Brodzinsky This resources offers best practice guidelines for supporting gay and lesbian adoptive parents.   2011
Experiences and Well-Being of Sexual and Gender Diverse Youth in Foster Care in New York City Theo G. M. Sandfort the study aimed to determine the proportion of lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care in new york city and whether the experiences of lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care differ from those of youth who are not lgBtQAi+. A telephone survey was conducted among youth, 13 to 21 years old, who were in foster care in new york city at the time of the survey (september – november 2019). the survey questionnaire included questions about the sexual and gender status, demographic characteristics, characteristics of the youth’s placement in foster care, the youth’s social connections, and their well-being. collected data about youths’ sexual and gender status were linked to Acs administrative data, to further explore differences between lgBtQAi+ youth and non-lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care.   November 2020
Fight for Our Girls: Introduction Tashira Halyard Through this series, Fight for Our Girls, the Center for the Study of Social Policy’s Alliance for Racial Equity in Child Welfare seeks to radically shift the narrative surrounding girls of color and status offenses from a focus on delinquency and misbehavior to structural discrimination, trauma and youth well-being. This is an introduction to a series of briefs that will promote programs, policies and initiatives aimed at developing a trauma-informed approach to addressing status offenses and supporting the ability of girls of color to thrive.  
Findings from the RISE Youth Qualitative Interviews This brief describes findings from interviews with nine youth who are participating in RISE. The RISE Initiative aims to reduce the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth in long-term foster care, and improve permanency by decreasing heterosexism and transphobia in caregiving settings. As part of the PII approach, a formative evaluation is being conducted to assess achievement of short- term outcomes: decreased heterosexism and transphobia. The formative evaluation is also monitoring initial implementation of the RISE interventions. Interviewed youth were asked to provide details on their perceptions of RISE, foster care services, and changes in their lives during receipt of services.  
Fostering Inequity: How COVID-19 Amplifies Dangers for LGBTQ+ Youth in Care Christina Wilson Remlin, Esq. Madeleine MacNeil Kinney, Esq. Daniele Gerard, Esq. Daniel Adamek This report was developed with extensive input from young people currently or formerly in foster care and young people currently or formerly experiencing homelessness who identify as LGBTQ+, and direct service workers. We identify how the pandemic is amplifying some of the risks for LGBTQ+ youth in child welfare systems and propose practices to mitigate them. Now, more than ever, LGBTQ+ young people must be protected. The report highlights how the discrimination, institutionalization, and abuse that LGBTQ+ youth already face are exacerbated by COVID-19:   June 2020
Gay Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Sexual Minority Youth Shelley L. Craig, Ashley Austin, Edward Alessi Cognitive Behavior Therapy that has been adapted to ensure (a) an affirming stance toward LGBTQ+ identities, (b) recognition and awareness of LGBTQ+-specific sources of stress, and (c) the delivery of CBT content within an affirming, developmentally relevant and trauma-informed framework. AFFIRM helps clients to identify and challenge internalized stigma and negative core beliefs in a safe and supportive clinical context.   22 December, 2012
Getting Down to Basics- Tools to Support LGBTQ Youth in Care This toolkit offers practice time and information to ensure that LGBTQ youth in child welfare and juvenile justice system receive affirming support and services while engaged in out-of-home care.   2013
Green Chimneys Nolan Green Chimneys was a transitional living program that operates in the state of New York. No longer operating in New York City, the program provided beds to homeless or at-risk LGBTQ youth between the ages of 17 to 21.  
Guidelines for Managing Information Related to the Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity and Expression of Children in Child Welfare Systems Wilber, S. This publication will begin to bridge the gap by proposing standards governing the management of information related to sexual orientation and gender identity and expression. This publication was developed in conjunction with the Putting Pride into Practice Project (“P4”), a three-year effort undertaken by Family Builders by Adoption, in partnership with the California Department of Social Services, to implement CWLA’s Best Practice Guidelines for Serving LGBT Youth in Out of Home Care in several county child welfare systems in California. P4’s objective is to increase the competence of child welfare professionals to serve children whose actual or perceived sexual orientation is other than heterosexual, and children whose gender identity or expression is incongruent with their biological sex or with cultural expectations related to gender presentation. The project provides training and technical assistance to build agency capacity and improve organizational competency through leadership and policy development, community and constituency engagement, and recruitment, training and support of placement resources.   January 2013
Guidelines for Managing Information Related to the Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity and Expression of Children in the Child Welfare System This publication was developed in conjunction with the Putting Pride into Practice Project (“P4”), a three-year effort undertaken by Family Builders by Adoption, in partnership with the California Department of Social Services, to implement CWLA’s Best Practice Guidelines for Serving LGBT Youth in Out of Home Care in several county child welfare systems in California. The project provides training and technical assistance to build agency capacity and improve organizational competency through leadership and policy development, community and constituency engagement, and recruitment, training and support of placement resources.   2013
Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People Psychologists who work with transgender or gender nonconforming people should seek to provide acceptance, support and understanding without making assumptions about their clients’ gender identities or gender expressions, according to practice guidelines adopted during the American Psychological Association’s 123rd Annual Convention.   2015
HIV Infection, Risk, Prevention, and Testing Behaviors Among Transgender Women Taylor Robbins This report summarizes findings from the first NHBS-Trans data collection cycle, which was conducted in 2019–2020. Transgender women, especially transgender women of color, are disproportionately affected by HIV. This report provides descriptive, unweighted data that can be used to describe HIV infection among transgender women and the percent- ages of transgender women reporting specific behaviors, HIV testing, access to care, participation in prevention programs, gender-affirming medical treatment, experiences of abuse and harassment, and suicidality. Collecting these data is useful for assessing risk, access to care and treatment, the use of prevention efforts, and other social structural factors affecting HIV prevention opportunities for this population.   April 2021
Health Equity Style Guide for the COVID-19 Response: Principles and Preferred Terms for Non- Stigmatizing, Bias-Free Language CDC’s Health Equity Style Guide emphasizes the importance of addressing all people inclusively, with respect, including using non-stigmatizing, bias-free language. Avoid perpetuating negative stereotypes or blaming people for their own life circumstances or health status when reporting data or information about health disparities.   August 2020
How to Gather Data on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Clinical Settings Judith B. Bradford, PhD; Sean Cahill, PhD; Chris Grasso, MPH; and Harvey J. Makadon, MD This brief reviews two methods for providers to collect sexual orientation and gender identity from parents.   2012
I Want to Be Like Nature Made Me: Medically Unnecessary Surgeries on Intersex Children in the US In this report, based on interviews with intersex adults, parents of intersex children, and medical practitioners working with intersex people, interACT and Human Rights Watch document the fall-out from that medical paradigm, and the failure of the medical community to regulate itself effectively. There have been changes in practice in recent years, with many doctors now advising against surgery on infants and young children. But even so, surgery continues to be practiced on children with atypical sex characteristics too young to participate in the decision, when those procedures both carry a meaningful risk of harm and can be safely deferred.  
Implementing System Wide Policy and Practice Improvements to Support LGBTQ+ Youth and Families with Child Welfare System Involvement Kristen Weber and Bill Bettencourt This report describes the processes and outcomes associated with implementing Guidelines for Managing Information Related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression and Identity in Child Welfare Systems in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The Guidelines outline ways in which child welfare jurisdictions can implement system wide innovations to better serve LGBTQ+ youth and their families.   May 2021
In-Home Resources for Families of LGBTQ Youth This brief reviews resources and best practices for supporting LGBTQ youth and their families in-home settings.  
Information Packet: Transgender Youth in Child Welfare Settings Sikerwar & Rider This fact sheet reviews the experiences of transgender youth in the child welfare system. It offers a brief overview of national legislation and best practices for agencies.   2015
Just As They Are This resource will help parents recognize when and how conversion therapy is promoted, provides information about the dangers of the practice, and offers guidance to parents regarding practices that promote their LGBTQ+ child’s health and well-being.  
Juvenile Facilities Checklist For Defenders: Advocating For The Safety And Well-Being of Transgender, Gender Non-Conforming, And Intersex Young People The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) produced a publication entitled “Juvenile Facilities Checklist for Defenders” to assist defenders in monitoring conditions and practices in detention and correctional facilities and other types of secure and non-secure facilities. The checklist provides defenders with the necessary tools to advocate for their clients in these facilities to prevent unnecessary or inappropriate placement, reduce the period of confinement, or intervene to challenge harmful conditions or practices on the young person’s behalf.   October 2019
LGBTQ & Gender-Affirming Spaces This brief uses data from The Trevor Project’s ?2020 National Survey on LGBTQ Youth Mental Health to examine the association between access to affirming spaces and suicide attempts. LGBTQ youth are at elevated risk for poor mental health and suicide compared with straight/cisgender peers (Johns et al, 2019; Johns et al., 2020). Because this risk is related to the harmful ways LGBTQ youth are treated, rather than something about being LGBTQ in itself, increased acceptance and affirmation can reduce risk (Meyer, 2016). All LGBTQ youth deserve access to spaces — such as homes, schools, and workplaces -- that positively affirm their LGBTQ identity. Unfortunately, not all LGBTQ youth experience acceptance of their identity, and physical distancing policies implemented to minimize the health risks of the COVID-19 pandemic can disrupt access to existing affirming spaces (Green, Price-Feeney, & Dorsion, 2020). This may be particularly true for transgender and nonbinary youth who have increased risk for attempting suicide due in large part to increased exposure to minority stress (Price-Feeney, Green, & Dorison, 2020; Hendricks & Testa, 2012).   December 2020
Latinx LGBTQ+ Immigrant Youth: A Provider Fact Sheet This Each Mind Matters fact sheet was created as a resource for service providers, including nonprofit staff, community-based organizations, health care professionals, and other providers. It provides an introduction to the unique challenges faced by Latinx LGBTQ+ immigrant youth, relevant resources, and best practices. In English and Spanish.  
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: A Guide to Juvenile Detention Reform This guide highlights a wide range of best practices that juvenile justice facilities can implement to advance the safety and well-being of LGBT youth.   September 28, 2015
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth within in welfare: Prevalence, risk and outcomes The purpose of this study was to estimate the population of sexual minority or LGB (lesbian, gay and bisexual) children and youth involved with the child welfare system, and to compare their health, mental health, placement and permanency outcomes to those of non-LGB youth. Data were drawn from the Second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW-II), a nationally representative sample of children who were referred to child welfare due to a report of abuse or neglect over a fifteen month period. Results indicate that approximately 15.5% of all system involved youth identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual, and that lesbian and bisexual females, and LGB youth of color are both overrepresented within child welfare systems. Although no substantive difference in risk factors, permanency and placement were found between LGB and Non-LGB youth, LGB youth were significantly more likely to meet the criteria for adverse mental health outcomes. Implications for child welfare practice and policy are presented, along with recommendations for future research in this area.  


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