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Title File Author Description Article Date
COVID-19 & LGBTQ Clients: Key Considerations HRC Foundation During this global crisis, child welfare organizations across the country continue to provide essential services to children, youth, and families. Social distancing requires new strategies for client engagement and creates new opportunities to ensure clients access services without encountering challenges related to their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. ACAF’s new tip sheet offers key areas to consider when working to mitigate these challenges through thoughtful action.   2020
COVID-19 Community Impact Survey (CCIS): Preliminary Analysis Results as of June 9, 2021 Selk, Sabrina Purpose and Approach of the Covid-19 Community Impact Survey (CCIS) Preliminary Findings- Population Spotlight: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, & Transgender Identify Goals: 1) Identify the most pressing immediate and long-term health needs created by the pandemic, including its social and economic consequences 2) Determine which populations have been most disproportionately impacted LGBTQ+ adults and youth have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, particularly POC and persons of trans experience The need to prioritize inclusion of LGBTQ+ residents in all areas – families, schools, state entities, healthcare, social services, and data systems –   June 2021
CWLA Best Practice Guidelines: Serving LGBTQ Youth in Out-of-Home Care This easy-to-use resource contains the first-ever set of comprehensive professional guidelines for how child welfare and juvenile justice professionals can best serve LGBT youth in state care. The Best Practice Guidelines for Serving LGBT Youth in Out of Home Care developed out of recommendations from the Model Standards Project, a collaboration between Legal Services for Children and the National Center for Lesbian Rights.   2006
Caring for LGBTQ Children & Youth: A Guide for Child Welfare Providers This booklet was developed to provide information about the care and support of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning children and youth. Unfortunately, we know LGBTQ youth are disproportionately represented in the child welfare system and often face discrimination and mistreatment in out-of-home care. This guide includes information on terminology and several basic, but key, tips on how to best support and care for LGBTQ children and youth.  
Change-Makers in Child Welfare 2020 Human Rights Campaign Foundation LGBTQ youths, who make up 30 percent of those in our foster care system, are twice as likely to report being treated poorly as their non-LGBTQ peers while in care. The new report, Change-Makers in Child Welfare 2020, highlights 100 child welfare agencies across the country that partnered with the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s All Children-All Families project to improve the services they provide to the LGBTQ community, including children in foster care and prospective foster and adoptive parents. These organizations serve more than 600,000 clients annually in 28 states and employ more than 15,000 individuals.  
Child Welfare Journal Vol. 96, No. 1 Special Issue: LGBTQ Article included in this publication: - Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative: Experiences and Outcomes of Youth who are LGBTQ - Creating Safer Spaces for Youth who are LGBTQ in Broward County, Florida: Collecting SOGIE Data for Life-Coaching Services - Strengthening Family Connections and Support for Youth in Foster Care who Identify as LGBTQ: Findings from the PII-RISE Evaluation - Gender Diversity and Child Welfare Research: Empirical Report and Implications of the Los Angeles County Foster Youth Study - ‘Because We’re Fighting to Be Ourselves’: Voices from Former Foster Youth who are Transgender and Gender Expansive - Queering the Question: Using Survey Marginalia to Capture Gender Fluidity in Housing and Child Welfare  
Child Welfare Journal Vol. 96, No. 2 Special Issue: LGBTQ Articles presented in this publication: - Reversing Erasure of Youth and Young Adults Who are LGBTQ and Access Homelessness Services: Asking about Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Pronouns - Child Welfare Systems and LGBTQ Youth Homelessness: Gender Segregation, Instability, and Intersectionality - Out of the System and onto the Streets: LGBTQ Identified Youth Experiencing Homelessness with Past Child Welfare System Involvement - Developing Relationship-Building Tools for Foster Families Caring for Teens who are LGBTQ2S - Yes We Can Allegheny: Implementing SOGIE Inclusive System Improvements in Child Welfare - Strengthening the Workforce to Support Youth in Foster Care who Identify as LGBTQ+ through Increasing LGBTQ+ Competency: Trainers’ Experience with Bias  
Coming Out: Living Authentically as Bisexual+ Coming out is different for every person. For bisexual people, coming out can present some unique challenges. As bisexual people, we face skepticism and stereotypes about our sexuality, we are ignored and excluded from LGBTQ+ spaces, and we are often invisible to each other - challenges that can make coming out a complicated process. Coming out can also be wonderful. It can relieve the stress of having to hide part of yourself, and it gives you the ability to bring your whole self to your life and your relationships. It can also give you the chance to be a role model to others and help you connect with the bisexual community and others who support and celebrate your identity. This guide is designed to prepare you for potential challenges of coming out as bisexual and to give you the tools to come out and live openly wherever and whenever you are safe, able and ready.   October 2021
Creating Gender-Affirming Meeting Spaces: A Tip Sheet for Planners LGBTQ TA Center Meeting planners have a responsibility to create welcoming and affirming meeting spaces for all participants. This LGBTQ TA Center tip sheet provides standard guidelines and helpful tips for setting up inclusive meetings in professional and social settings. The tip sheet focuses on five key areas: why pronouns are important, name tags, respectful introductions, restroom labels, and breakout group norms.  
Creating Safer Spaces for LGBTQ Youth Toolkit Armonté Butler This Toolkit has been developed to assist individuals, community-based organizations, providers, healthcare staff, educators, and others that see the value of incorporating key safer space components into their organizations so that young people survive and thrive. Recommendations serve as a guide and should be tailored to each individual young person and organizational setting. It highlights challenges faced by LGBTQ youth, offers insight on how they thrive, and enhances the awareness among healthcare staff, educators, and additional youth-serving professionals about the existing disparities in order to provide more comprehensive, competent, evidence-based care and support to this community.  
Critical Issues and LGBT-Two Spirit Populations: Highlights from the HONOR Project Study A health survey of Two-Spirit Native Americans designed to (a) test a theoretically driven stress and coping model among 447 twospirit American Indians via a structured survey; (b) design and test the feasibility of various peer-driven sampling recruitment methodologies to produce a national representative sample; and (c) conduct a qualitative study with 65 leaders to identify major strengths and coping strategies in this population.   2010
Cultural Adaptation Planning Tool Angela Weeks, DBA This tool should be used to assess cultural fit of a program prior to selecting the program and also during the cultural adaptation process. Leaders need to ensure that EBPs and EIPs that are being considered for adaptation are able to be adapted to the needs of the clients they serve. This assessment and decisions concerning adaptation should be done in partnership with the communities being served so that any changes made are informed by people with lived and shared experiences.   2021
Eight Ways to Promote the Health and Well-Being of LGBTQ+ Youth Involved with Child Welfare Alexandra Citrin and Megan Martin The Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA)1 marks a substantial movement toward child welfare reform by beginning to bring child welfare financing into alignment with what research tells us is best for children and families. Children and youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer/questioning (LGBTQ+)2 experience both disproportionate involvement with child welfare, and once involved, disparate outcomes including placement instability and longer stays in foster care. Through FFPSA there is a significant opportunity for child welfare systems to address existing disproportionalities and disparities for LGBTQ+ children, youth and families. Successful implementation of these strategies will in turn support state efforts in achieving an equitable child welfare system with better outcomes and improved well-being for all children, youth and families.   August 2019
Engaging the Families of Transgender & Gender Diverse Children National LGBTQIA+ Health Education Center, National Health Care for the Homeless Council This publication engages pediatric primary care providers, mental health providers, health center administrators, and support staff in learning how to actively engage families in the support of their transgender and gender-diverse (TGD) children, with the aim of improving the health outcomes for TGD youth. Providers will learn best practices for serving the families of TGD youth, and strategies for successfully providing resources and referrals in response to a variety of family and patient needs and priorities.   2021
Ensuring Competent Residential Interventions for Youth with Diverse Gender and Sexual Identities and Expressions Douglas A. Glick This paper focuses on the many issues faced in the field in providing quality residential interventions for youth of sexual diversity, including sexual orientation and gender identity. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and two-spirit (LGBTQI2-S) youth in residential care, open expression of sexuality or gender identity can be a significant challenge, with many barriers faced both within the program and in the community at large. This paper provides guidelines and strategies for serving and supporting LGBTQI2-S youth, building on the efforts of programs that have successfully created “sexual and gender minority-positive” cultures.   2014
Expanding Resources for Children III: Research-Based Best Practices in Adoption by Gays and Lesbians Brodzinsky This resources offers best practice guidelines for supporting gay and lesbian adoptive parents.   2011
Experiences and Well-Being of Sexual and Gender Diverse Youth in Foster Care in New York City Theo G. M. Sandfort the study aimed to determine the proportion of lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care in new york city and whether the experiences of lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care differ from those of youth who are not lgBtQAi+. A telephone survey was conducted among youth, 13 to 21 years old, who were in foster care in new york city at the time of the survey (september – november 2019). the survey questionnaire included questions about the sexual and gender status, demographic characteristics, characteristics of the youth’s placement in foster care, the youth’s social connections, and their well-being. collected data about youths’ sexual and gender status were linked to Acs administrative data, to further explore differences between lgBtQAi+ youth and non-lgBtQAi+ youth in foster care.   November 2020
Faith Communities & the Well-Being of LGBT Youth The Psychiatry and Religion and LGBTQ+ committees of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry have created a booklet called Faith Communities and the Well-Being of LGBT Youth. Published online, the booklet addresses ways in which faith leaders and faith communities can support LGBT youth in their communities to mitigate mental health challenges. The booklet acknowledges the common interests shared by medicine and religion in the welfare of young individuals. Then, it describes multiple mental health challenges faced by LGBT youth, including suicide, depression, anxiety, substance use, bullying, and homelessness. Through both religion and medicine, it seeks to alleviate pain and address difficult aspects of life to enhance physical, social, emotional, and spiritual well-being.   2020
Fight for Our Girls: Introduction Tashira Halyard Through this series, Fight for Our Girls, the Center for the Study of Social Policy’s Alliance for Racial Equity in Child Welfare seeks to radically shift the narrative surrounding girls of color and status offenses from a focus on delinquency and misbehavior to structural discrimination, trauma and youth well-being. This is an introduction to a series of briefs that will promote programs, policies and initiatives aimed at developing a trauma-informed approach to addressing status offenses and supporting the ability of girls of color to thrive.  
Financial Support & Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community Christopher Murray This guide offers a host of resources for LGBTQ+ people considering their financial affairs, from taxes to estate planning and more.   10/27/2021
Financing & Support for Gender Confirmation Surgery Laura Dorwart If you or a loved one is thinking about undergoing gender affirmation surgery, there are some basics you should know about the transgender community, average medical transition care costs and more.   8/25/2021
Findings from the RISE Youth Qualitative Interviews This brief describes findings from interviews with nine youth who are participating in RISE. The RISE Initiative aims to reduce the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth in long-term foster care, and improve permanency by decreasing heterosexism and transphobia in caregiving settings. As part of the PII approach, a formative evaluation is being conducted to assess achievement of short- term outcomes: decreased heterosexism and transphobia. The formative evaluation is also monitoring initial implementation of the RISE interventions. Interviewed youth were asked to provide details on their perceptions of RISE, foster care services, and changes in their lives during receipt of services.  
Fostering Inequity: How COVID-19 Amplifies Dangers for LGBTQ+ Youth in Care Christina Wilson Remlin, Esq. Madeleine MacNeil Kinney, Esq. Daniele Gerard, Esq. Daniel Adamek This report was developed with extensive input from young people currently or formerly in foster care and young people currently or formerly experiencing homelessness who identify as LGBTQ+, and direct service workers. We identify how the pandemic is amplifying some of the risks for LGBTQ+ youth in child welfare systems and propose practices to mitigate them. Now, more than ever, LGBTQ+ young people must be protected. The report highlights how the discrimination, institutionalization, and abuse that LGBTQ+ youth already face are exacerbated by COVID-19:   June 2020
Gay Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Sexual Minority Youth Shelley L. Craig, Ashley Austin, Edward Alessi Cognitive Behavior Therapy that has been adapted to ensure (a) an affirming stance toward LGBTQ+ identities, (b) recognition and awareness of LGBTQ+-specific sources of stress, and (c) the delivery of CBT content within an affirming, developmentally relevant and trauma-informed framework. AFFIRM helps clients to identify and challenge internalized stigma and negative core beliefs in a safe and supportive clinical context.   22 December, 2012
Gender Pronouns 101: What They Are & Why They Matter Campaign for Southern Equality Pronouns are the words we use in place of an individual’s proper name. Examples include “she/her/hers,” “he/him/his,” and “they/them/theirs.” Learn what they are and why matter using this fact sheet from the Campaign for Southern Equality. Remember that practice makes perfect. Practice using pronouns, get used to sharing your own pronouns, and be OK with making mistakes. Eventually, this will come naturally and you’ll be consistently taking an important step toward treating everyone with decency and respect.  


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